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'92 Astro LT - Silver / Gray / 4 Wheels
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The Connector pinning was especially riveting.
Thanks for the Well Done Docs n' Pics.

Looking forward to hearing the V8.
And as Woody says... "The Bride squealing with Joy".
 

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:chevy: Lol, you remember that Mike?
The wife took video of the first start and when I saw the vid I heard her comments. I couldn't hear anything in the truck but I knew she was happy for me.
When I took her for the first run in the new '05 I told her to buckle up and hang on so she had fair warning, what came forth after was something more along the lines of shock and
awe terror... :auto-layrubber:
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
sixsix said:
The Connector pinning was especially riveting.
I think you need to get out more. ;)

Somedays I only get out to work on the van in the early hours of the morning before the world starts waking up; a little bit here, a little bit there. As previously mentioned, the installation went cleanly and when I finally got all the bolt-ons bolted-on and some water in the radiator (yes, "water"; ethylene glycol (green) is waiting in the wings until I get the Dexcool flushed out of the heater) and gave the key a crank, I was met with the favorite of all favorites: Crank but No Start.

The flexplate would jump off the starter as the engine fired but never enough to for the engine to be self-supporting, the kind of thing that immediately makes you think, "Timing is off."

Check. Nope. Wasn't. Mentally back to basics: Air, Fuel, Spark (right amounts in the right time).

I'm surrounded by air. Skippy Flywheel tells me there's something in the way of spark. Stick a screwdriver in the fuel line Schrader valve... Yeah, that was smart! :roll: It did what it should have, ("This is a van you moron. The engine is half in the interior. Fuel and carpet do not go well together. How 'bout we go get the gauge so we can see numbers?) 48 - 50 with a half-dead battery hooked to life support (jumper cables to the Jeep).

So the mind starts wondering, "When are we going to get something to eat?" No. Wait...
"Did you really get the PCM wiring right? Are the injectors getting a signal? Are they getting the signal in the right order? How do you know?" Man, I hate second guessing myself. I like to think I got it all right, but if everything were right, it'd be going "Vroom! Vroom!" and it isn't. It's only going, "Snap! Crackle! Pop!" with an added metal-grinding "Crunch!" every time the starter smashes itself back into an almost-spinning flexplate.

Okay. We know the injectors have a keyed-on power source. It stands to reason that the PCM grounds the connection to make each injector open in the correct order. So let's see what's in the electrical junk drawer (and the trash bin) that we can work with:


Pretty High Tech, right? The Pink wire running from the left goes to the positive (+) side of all the LEDs. Each of the wires from the bottom runs from each negative (-). I'll stick each one in the corresponding pin receptacle of main injector connector and when the PCM completes the ground, I should - theoretically - get an indication. (If you're going this far, you already know LEDs are Diodes first. They're like check-valves for electricity. The Light is secondary. Put them in backwards and they stop the flow as designed, not lighting. I used them over bulbs since I had no idea how quick the signal was going to be and the LEDs take much less energy to light. I thought I'd have a better chance of seeing something over trying to light a filament.)

Behind the curtain:


I wired them to match the colors of the wires in the connector so I wouldn't have to do a whole lot of thinking while I was hooking it up and as soon as I was done I thought, "If I were smart I would've laid it out in Firing Order to make it easier to see that the sequence was right, not just whether they were all getting a signal."

Here it is in action:

"Poop! That worked out." I'm glad I can connect wires together properly at each end, but if something was wrong I'd have something to fix. (The more I eliminate, the more I know what it isn't.) Grab the 10mm socket. Get to this:

Okay, now we have something to work with.


For anybody working on their own, after removing the two bottom nuts and the retaining plate, the injector valves just pull out. There are no tabs to release, only the plate holds them in. The main electrical plug is just connecting to these valves. The 'slots' between the black piece 3/4 down are extremely-fine screens and they are open to the cavity of the plastic main body that your lines connect to. It fills with fuel - pressure regulating valve on the far end. Each of these valves get its signal to open with these intakes inside the body, letting pressurized fuel flow through the outlet to the individual tubes.


But during disassembly, a couple of these tabs that hold the spray nozzle in the tube broke off, as had two of the squeezy ones you use when removing the injector from it's manifold hole. I knew it was iffy when I assembled the engine. I just didn't expect to be removing it so soon. Silly me.


Well... even if I can get it cleaned-up, I'm not putting it in... and I sure do like the idea of the injector down near the port like what they did on the 4.3:


I think I'll do that too :D


Which brings us to this:
 

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WOOHOO!!! AWESOME!!!
 

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Very nice work! I have enjoyed the trip and applaud your ambition. :rockon:
Rod J
Issaquah, WA
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
Always a great feeling!
Thanks for all the support. It makes something like this so much more enjoyable than it would be otherwise.

Besides installing the driveshafts and adding fluids where necessary I took care of the little leftover stuff I pushed aside when focusing on the "get it running" necessities, things like lengthening some of the wiring to alleviate the tension created by the longer engine:


and flushing the Dexcool out of the heater core and the hoses


until it ran clear.


I also took the opportunity to take care of some of the stuff I definitely wouldn't have spent time on before the van was running.
Someone spent a little bit of effort to put these things on:


so I spent a little bit of effort removing them ;)


I still have one or two more things to take care of before I'm able to put the transmission through its paces.
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
I figured if I was getting ready to make it move, I should make sure it'll stop... so I drilled a few holes in a jar lid that matched some found barbed fittings and pulled an old refrigerator compressor out of the undershelf dust:






And I did some cutting on the fan shroud. I started to get all fancy with it, cutting only around the crank and power steering pulleys and leaving the rest. I looked at it for a short time and it's not like the extra is going to do any good and it looked like it'll be more of a hassle for future belt changes so I just pulled it back out and removed the 1-5/8" straight across.


Given the opportunity I'd consider removing another 1/2".


But at one point during the fitting trials I put my hand against the fins of the radiator and they were wet in a spot. :| Although I've only had it up to temp with the cap on (pressurizing) once, there's been nothing dripping or on the ground. Still, I suspect I'll be upgrading to the thicker core radiator sooner than originally planned. I guess that'll give me the opportunity to cut the additional 1/2" from the lower shroud. Yay! :|
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
So I thought I was done for the night, but I had 20 minutes or so of down time and I thought I'd go out and try fitting the upper fan shroud. (I hear there's a support group for this... "AstroHaul-its Unanimous" or something like that, but I digress.)

Anyway, I cut the same 1-5/8" I cut from the bottom shroud off the top to check the fit.

Sooo glad I painted my engine.

The alternator side looks like there isn't enough removed, but it might be a little misleading.


The A/C compressor is the real offender. It sticks into the shroud another inch, so more than that needs to be removed, but it is also preventing the shroud from sitting a little further to the passenger side where it should be.
Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18 Show Content


I'll take another look at it tomorrow, but at this point I'll work the A/C clearance issue first. I'll probably just make a clearance cutout 1st and see what that does for the alternator pulley.

Little by little.
 
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