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Hello,

I am completely new to electronics and I got a book from the library the other day that gives a general overview. However, the book was published in USA in San Fransisco and I am based in the UK in London. I have heard that there is a different voltage in the UK compared to USA so I wonder if the electronic pieces the books suggests to buy might not work here in the UK. If anybody know if that is the case or not i would really appreciate.
regards
hudson

https://192168101.link/
 

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It is not just the voltage that is different. The cycles (how many times per second it changes) shown as Hz (Hertz) is different also. The US is a 110 Volt, 60 Hz. The UK and Europe are 220 Volt, 50Hz. This only affects household electric.

Automobiles are 6, 12, or 24 Volt and possibly larger.
6 volt are typically small motors like lawn mowers or golf carts.
12 volt are general automotive cars and trucks.
24 volt are typically larger motors like semi trucks and ships (big diesel engines).

In this case a volt is the same as any other volt. If you take 2 - 6 volt batteries hooked together in series (positive to negative) it is the same as a single 12 volt battery but the capacity stays the same. If you hook 2 - 6 volt batteries in parallel (positive to positive) you still only have 6 volts but you double the capacity. Likewise a bank of 4 - 6 volt batteries in series would be the same as a 24 volt battery.

Things start getting real fun and complicated when you start working with capacity (Watts), and current flow (Amps). In automotive electronics is gets extremely complicated when you start dealing with millivolts (millionth volt).
 

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I would just say what you are asking about is not 'electronics'; that is things like microchips etc.
If that is what you meant then they definitely won't work.

'milli' means a thousandth.

May I suggest you use a UK 'electrics' forum.

This is a good one: several forums for different subjects.
 

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I would just say what you are asking about is not 'electronics'; that is things like microchips etc.
If that is what you meant then they definitely won't work.
So a house battery system in a camper van won't work?
A volt is a volt. The difference is in quantity and usage.
And some curly gray hairs:eek:

'milli' means a thousandth.
I stand corrected.
 

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Not sure what a house battery system is; I don't think they have such things in the UK - especially in London.

However, if the OP buys general electrical items from the US, they won't work and presumably electronic items - computers etc. - would just need a different power supply.

The nominal voltage Europe is 230V.
The UK changed its nominal voltage to 230V to 'harmonize' with Europe but the actual supply voltage is still 240V.
 

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As far as automotive stuff, it's virtually all 12v except some military/commercial/heavy-duty vehicles. Almost all consumer electronics are dual voltage these days, usually only requiring a cheap plug adapter.

What exactly is it that you are trying to learn about? I assume automotive as you are posting in an automotive forum :)
 

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It is not just the voltage that is different. The cycles (how many times per second it changes) shown as Hz (Hertz) is different also. The US is a 110 Volt, 60 Hz. The UK and Europe are 220 Volt, 50Hz. This only affects household electric.

Automobiles are 6, 12, or 24 Volt and possibly larger.
6 volt are typically small motors like lawn mowers or golf carts.
12 volt are general automotive cars and trucks.
24 volt are typically larger motors like semi trucks and ships (big diesel engines).

In this case a volt is the same as any other volt. If you take 2 - 6 volt batteries hooked together in series (positive to negative) it is the same as a single 12 volt battery but the capacity stays the same. If you hook 2 - 6 volt batteries in parallel (positive to positive) you still only have 6 volts but you double the capacity. Likewise a bank of 4 - 6 volt batteries in series would be the same as a 24 volt battery.

Things start getting real fun and complicated when you start working with capacity (Watts), and current flow (Amps). In automotive electronics is gets extremely complicated when you start dealing with millivolts (millionth volt).
 

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Hudson 10:
If you are referring to home (residential) power, then there are significant differences in voltage supplied from the wall,and the frequency of said power . So many appliances are not compatible with US devices.
I see a reference to 'house battery" in one of the posts. I believe that may be in reference to the 'house battery' in a camper or trailer (caraven to the Brit's) , as opposed to the engine starting battery. .
If that is the case; and your questions are about automotive systems, then for the most part it is all the same (12 volts DC) . There are few common vehicles that use anything besides a 12 volt system ( newer electric cars are possible exceptions, but even they use 12 volts DC for most accessories).
If you have specific questions, I might be able to help you get started in the right direction.
Rod J
Issaquah, WA
 

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Nice reply Ghost. The only place the two systems meet is ( 1 watt = 1 joule ) now using ohms law one can figure out the rest.
Watts is a unit of power measurement. Joules is a unit of energy measurement. They ain't the same thing. One Watt is one Joule per second. A Joule is a Watt integrated over one second of time, or a Watt Second. A kilowatt hour (as measured by your electric utility companies watthour meter) is 3600 kilowatt seconds or 3,600,000 watt seconds, or 3,600,000 Joules.
 

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Hello,

I am completely new to electronics and I got a book from the library the other day that gives a general overview. However, the book was published in USA in San Fransisco and I am based in the UK in London. I have heard that there is a different voltage in the UK compared to USA so I wonder if the electronic pieces the books suggests to buy might not work here in the UK. If anybody know if that is the case or not i would really appreciate.
regards
hudson
Start by learning about electricity before going into electronics. Electronics is when you have vacuum tubes (valves in the UK) or transistors or other semiconductor devices. If you are applying your knowledge to automobiles you don't have to learn much about alternating current, because there isn't that much AC stuff going on in an automobile. Learn the basics of DC electrics. Ohms Law, DC power. Parallel versus series connected circuits. That kind of stuff. The only places in a 2005 or earlier Astro/Safari where AC electric theory applies is in the Alternator and the spark coil. Alternators have built in rectifiers and outside of them everything is DC. Spark coils use changing current in the primary to induce current in the secondary. Other than that you don't have to think much about alternating current in a Astro/Safari Older vehicles in the UK may have had a "positive earth" versus negative ground in almost all USA cars.
 

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With the obvious differences in Line power, (120 vs 220) and frequency. Electronics is Electronics no mater where you live.

@N6KB Valves? Not to many people remember them. . I worked at RCA long ago making them. Believe it or not, They are still around in things like microwave. ovens
 
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