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2003 - Chevy Astro Cargo - RWD
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3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So so so, im finally undertaking the famous ABS/Brake warning light issue on my little baby Astro.

i've watched the video, read the thread, googled it, and im wondering if anyone have a comprehensive list of what i need, and it's exact location?

i've seen conflicting screw sizes, and conflicting location details and i want to get this right on the first go.

id be so so so grateful if anyone could help me out. what exactly do i need to do a full and proper job, and where exactly is it and what procedure is best to remove without issues.

thank you thank you thank you for letting this forum exist. 馃檹
 

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2005 AWD 3+1 on 32X17's.
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79 Posts
The unit is mounted at the frame rail underneath the van at the drivers seat. This likely will not be a job you can pull off in a day even if you had all the right tools.

Have you checked the codes? What error codes are you getting for ABS? Are you positive the wheel speed sensors are not the culprit?

I am assuming you think the well documented ground inside the unit is the issue.

First, check to see if the power wire to the unit is still connected. Its a big pink wire. It tends to burn out at the connector. If it is all in order, commence pulling the cover off the ABS.

The cover is facing the underside of the floor pan...super tough location. There are 10 or so T14 screws which have to be removed in order to free the board.

Float the board ground per the online video instruction and reinstall.

Best- VANNY
 

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Common Sense + Critical Thinking
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14,592 Posts
If you are planning on doing a lift, do that first ;) Makes removing the screws so easy. If you live anywhere with rust, spray those screws down a few times with penetration oil before you start working on it.

Normal hand tools, torx for the screws, utility knife to cut the cover off, soldering iron, and sealant to seal it all back up.
 

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2002 Astro LT RWD
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125 Posts
Back in 2018, I spent an hour so under mine with a small die grinder trying to remove the heads from the heavily corroded fasteners. Too tedious and frustrating with a strong possibility of failure. Ended up removing the driver seat and cutting a small hole in the floor. Worked great and gave me easy access. I highly recommend replacing the fasters with stainless upon assembly.
Coincidentally, I'm actually in the process this Winter of cleaning up the ECBM hole I cut a few years back along with some other floor pan issues.
Automotive tire Hood Automotive lighting Tread Bumper
 

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I just fixed this same issue. I bought a repaired unit ($200) on Ebay with a core charge ($75) and took it to a shop to be properly replaced. Sorry I cant help with the procedure but its been around 3-4 days since the repair and I have yet to get the dreaded ABS/ brake light combo yet 馃The repair should only cost you $200-300 labor for a shop to properly replace the ABS unit and give you back the core.
 

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Been down this road too many times. Last year, had the dreaded ever-running abs motor. Tried all the quicky fixes to no avail. Finally got the shits as mine had the "I've been sitting in salt water for 20 years" rust and corrosion everywhere. Cut the brake lines off as they were so rusted, the first two just twisted off anyway. Removed and replaced the unit, had a parts van. Reinstalled with AN fittings and braided teflon hoses all the way back to the master cylinder. Problem solved and don't have to worry about the corrosion thing again, well there anyway. It costs a little more but is so much easier then bending and double flaring each and every line. Now if you can salvage your lines, take the unit out repair it and put it back, neverseize the fittings and the lines on the fittings and you are back on the road.
 

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241 Posts
I have repaired two of these. I own two 2005 Astros. In both cases the only fault was the cracked solder joints on the printed circuit board that connects to the solenoid coils that actuate the valves in ABS system. I did not have to disconnect a single brake system hydraulic line. I did not have to remove the ABS valve assembly. All I had to do was reflow the solder. What that means is that you heat the solder joint with a clean soldering iron until it melts and then allow the solder to re-solidify. This reestablishes the bad connections. Sometimes adding a little rosin core solder will help, not necessarily because there is not enough solder there already, but rather because having your soldering iron tip wet with fresh molten solder helps with the heat transfer to the old solder you are melting.
 
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